Monthly Archive for January, 2012

North East Ontario Regional Directors Report for February, 2012

North East Ontario Regional Directors Report for February, 2012

2012-01-31

Some Amateurs have been asking about distracted driving so here is a status report on the exemption that RAC is seeking for Ontario Amateurs. You will remember last year Steve Pengelly, VE3STV, Jeff Stewart, VE3WXM and I made a presentation to MTO officials requesting an exemption for Amateurs from Ontario Legislation 366/09. The MTO officials asked for some time to think this through and made a commitment to contact us in early 2012. We expect to hear from them in the next several months. At the moment we are advising all Ontario Amateurs to wait for a reply from MTO. If the reply is in our favour, end of story. If not we
have several ideas in the works. They include but are not limited to, targeting MPP’s, and a letter writing campaign from 3rd party groups, who we support with our province wide communications infrastructure at no cost to the taxpayer. Stay tuned.

The Committee to reform the Ontario’s Field Services has now finished its report and it is in the hands of Doug Mercer, VO1DTM. Watch for an official RAC bulletin from him on the details in the next while. I will talk more about this next month.

As I have mentioned in the last several Directors reports membership in RAC is actually increasing. Again slowly but it is increasing. Membership in the Mapleleaf Membership category is at 140 members. I would like to thank all those members who have renewed or rejoined Radio Amateurs of Canada at either membership level. I believe it shows Canadian Amateurs understand the need for a strong national organization to speak for all Canadian Amateurs

While the books for 2011 have not gone to the auditors yet, we will end the year in the black and are budgeting for the same in 2012. It should come as no surprise that RAC was “fiscally challenged” for the last few years. We have turned this situation around and RAC is on its way to economic stability.

We are still looking for a Treasurer for RAC. If you have a professional certification and are familiar with Quick Books please contact me.

Finally one of my favourite operating events is coming up on February 4. It’s the Freeze Your Buns Off QRP event. This year we will be operating in the back field of the North West Ontario Seniors Amateur Radio Club station at the 55+ Center in Thunder Bay. Please give a listen for VE3XT who will be operating from my favourite snow bank.

If you have any questions or concerns please email me at ve3xt@rac.ca.

Bill Unger – VE3XT

North East Ontario Regional Director – Radio Amateurs of Canada

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

RAC Blog Editor/RAC E-News/Web News Bulletin Editor

Special WRC Report Number One

Special WRC Report Number One

2012-01-29

The International Telecommunication Union ("ITU") World Radiocommunication Conference 2012 (WRC-12) started 23 January 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland. This is the "big show" for spectrum allocation matters and a very important meeting if you are an amateur radio operator anywhere in the world. Every 4 or 5 years a WRC takes place. The last one was in 2007. Approximately 3,000 people will attend WRC-12. These are government officials, telecommunication industry people and others, like the IARU, who have an interest in the use of the radio spectrum. The agenda items discussed during WRC-12 were established at the previous WRC in 2007. In the past 4.5 years there have been many committee meetings within the ITU to try to arrive at solutions that will satisfy each of the agenda items. In the case of some of the agenda items, several possible methods to satisfy the agenda item have been identified. Itis up to the WRC to select the most appropriate method to satisfy the agenda item, that is, to arrive at an worldwide solution to the issue presented in the agenda item.

There are a number of agenda items for WRC-12 that have some impact on amateur radio, immediately or sometime in the future. Each of the agenda items is assigned to a committee and also sub-working groups. Within each of these sub-working groups the agenda items are discussed in detail, the proposals from regional telecommunication organizations are analyzed, and the discussion proceeds toward developing a consensus on the agenda item. It seems to the casual observer to be a slow, tedious process but it works quite well in developing consensus, assuming the parties are at least a little bit flexible in their views.

AI 1.23. The agenda item that has been discussed widely within the amateur community over the last 5 years is agenda item AI 1.23. In 2007, the agenda item was stated as follows: "to consider an allocation of about 15 kHz in parts of the band 415-526.5 kHz to the amateur service on a secondary basis, taking into account the need to protect existing services" There are a number of suggested ways to satisfy this agenda item that are being discussed at the WRC: 1. A secondary allocation of up to 15 kHz to the ARS on a worldwide basis between 472 kHz and 487 kHz. 2. Two non-contiguous worldwide secondary allocations to the ARS at 461-469 kHz and 471-478 kHz, totalling 15 kHz. 3. A CEPT proposal for a worldwide secondary allocation of 8 KHz from 472 to 480 kHz. 4. No change.

  • It appears from the first several days of committee meetings that many of the member states attending the WRC are in favor of granting the amateur radio service an allocation but the details remain to be established. The member states that are in favor of No Change (NOC) have stated that they are primarily concerned with possible interference to Non Direction Beacons that currently operate in the spectrum under consideration. It is still early in the process to determine if the amateur service will succeed in gaining an allocation in this portion of the spectrum.

AI 1.10. This agenda item is as follows: "to examine the frequency allocation requirements with regard to operation of safety systems for ships and ports and associated regulatory provisions, in accordance with Resolution 357 (WRC-07)" This agenda item might have impacted the IARU goal of achieving a secondary allocation under AI 1.23. However, with the dropping of the AI 1.23 Method for an amateur allocation between 493 and 510 kHz, there should no longer be a conflict between maritime service objectives for AI 1.10 and amateur service objectives for AI 1.23.

AI 1.15. This agenda item is as follows: "to consider possible allocations in the range 3-50 MHz to the radiolocation service for oceanographic radar applications, taking into account the results of ITU-R studies, in accordance with Resolution 612" ITU committee meetings leading up to WRC-12 have identified the following bands to be studied under this Agenda Item: 3.5 . 5.5 MHz, 8 . 10 MHz, 12 . 14 MHz, 24 . 30 MHz, 39 . 45 MHz. These have been refined to particular candidate sub-bands including 5.060-5.450 MHz, 13.870-14.000 MHz, 24.000-24.890 MHz and 29.700-30.000 MHz. The IARU position is that oceanographic radar applications are incompatible with the amateur and amateur satellite services in the range 3 to 50 MHz and should not be allocated in bands already allocated to the amateur and amateur satellite service, including 5.250-5.450 MHz in which a growing number of administrations are providing for some access by amateurs on a domestic basis.

Footnotes. At each WRC, there is an agenda item that deals with footnotes contained within the Radio Regulations. Generally, this is a situation where an administration (a country) has "opted out" of the decision of a WRC and therefore creates an exception to the table of frequencies in the Radio Regulations. For example, a country may say that it will not use a certain service in a portion of the spectrum that has been designated for that service by the WRC. Therefore, a footnote is created in the Radio Regulations for that portion of the spectrum indicating a designated use is not available in that country even though it may be available in many other parts of the world. There are a number of examples of footnotes that relate to amateur radio. One of IARU's tasks during each WRC is to try to get administrations to remove their country's name from footnotes that prevent amateurs in that country from using spectrum that is available for amateur radio usage in other countries.

There are other agenda items which the IARU has determined to be a low threat to the amateur radio and the amateur-satellite services but those items will be closely watched by the IARU Team at the WRC-12 to make sure they do not negatively impact amateur radio.

WRC-12 started on Monday, 23 January and will conclude on Friday, 17 February. During this four week period, as the working groups and sub-working groups go through the agenda items I will report any significant developments in subsequent electronic newsletters.

Rod Stafford, W6ROD

Secretary – IARU Region 2

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

RAC Blog Editor/RAC E-News/Web News Bulletin Editor

Rapport spécial de la CMR, numéro un

Rapport spécial de la CMR, numéro un

2012-01-29

La Conférence mondiale des radiocommunications 2012 (CMR-12) de l'Union Internationale des Télécommunications ("UIT") a débuté le 23 janvier 2012 à Genève, Suisse. C'est le "grand spectacle" pour les sujets d'allocations du spectre radio et une très importante rencontre si vous êtes un opérateur radioamateur partout dans le monde. Une CMR à lieu tous les 4 ou 5 ans. La dernière a eu lieu en 2007. Approximativement 3000 personnes assisteront à la CMR-12. Ce sont des représentants gouvernementaux, des gens de l'industrie des télécommunications et d'autres, comme l'UIRA, qui ont un intérêt dans l'utilisation du spectre radio. Les sujets à l'ordre du jour discutés pendant la CMR-12 ont été établis à la précédente CMR en 2007. Pendant les 4,5 dernières années, il y a eu plusieurs rencontres de comités à l'intérieur de l'UIT pour tenter d'arriver à des solutions qui répondront à chaque sujet de l'ordre du jour. Pour ce qui est de certains de ces sujets,
plusieurs méthodes possibles pour répondre aux sujets de l'ordre du jour ont été identifiées. Il est du ressort de la CMR de choisir la méthode la plus appropriée pour répondre à un sujet en particulier, c.-à-d. pour arriver à une solution mondiale sur le sujet à l'ordre du jour.

Il y a plusieurs sujets à l'ordre du jour pour la CMR-12 qui ont un impact sur la radio amateur, immédiatement ou à un certain moment dans le futur. Chacun des sujets sur l'ordre du jour est attribué à un comité et également à des sous-groupes de travail. À l'intérieur de chacun de ces sous-groupes de travail, les sujets à l'ordre du jour sont discutés en détail, les propositions des organisations de télécommunications régionales sont analysées, et la discussion est orientée pour développer un consensus sur le sujet à l'ordre du jour. Il semble pour l'observateur superficiel que c'est un processus lent et fastidieux, mais il fonctionne assez bien pour en arriver à un consensus, en supposant que les parties sont au moins un petit peu flexibles dans leurs points de vue.

AI 1.23. Le sujet à l'ordre du jour qui a été largement discuté à l'intérieur de la communauté radio amateur au cours des derniers 5 ans est le sujet AI 1.23. En 2007, le sujet à l'ordre du jour a été formulé ainsi: "examiner la possibilité d'une attribution de fréquences d'environ 15 kHz dans des sections de la bande 415-526.5 kHz au service radio amateur sur une base secondaire, prenant en considération la nécessité de protéger les services existants". Il existe plusieurs façons suggérées de satisfaire à ce sujet de l'ordre du jour qui sont en discussion à la CMR:
1. Une attribution secondaire jusqu'à 15 kHz au SRA sur une base mondiale entre 472 kHz et 487 khz. 2. Deux attributions secondaires mondiales non contiguës au SRA à 461-469 kHz et 471-478 khz, totalisant 15 kHz. 3. Une proposition du CEPT pour une attribution secondaire mondiale de 8 kHz de 472 à 480 kHz. 4. Aucun changement.

Il semble d'après les premiers jours des rencontres des comités que plusieurs des états membres participant à la CMR sont en faveur d'accorder au service radio amateur une attribution, mais les détails doivent encore être déterminés. Les états membres qui sont en faveur du "aucun changement" (AUC) ont déclaré qu'ils sont surtout préoccupés au sujet d'une possible interférence aux balises non-directionnelles qui opèrent présentement dans le spectre de féquences sous étude. Il est encore trop tôt dans le processus pour déterminer si le service radio amateur réussira à gagner une attribution dans cette portion du spectre.

AI 1.10. Ce sujet à l'ordre du jour se lit ainsi: "pour examiner les besoins d'attributions de fréquences en regard de systèmes de sécurité pour les navires et les ports, et dispositions réglementaires associées, en accord avec la résolution 357 (CMR-07)". Cet sujet de l'ordre du jour peut avoir affecté l'objectif de l'UIRA pour obtenir une attribution secondaire sous AI 1.23. Cependant, avec l'abandon de la méthode d'attribution de AI 1.23 pour une attribution radio amateur entre 493 et 510 kHz, il ne devrait plus y avoir de conflit entre les objectifs des services maritimes pour AI 1.10 et les objectifs du service radio amateur pour AI 1.23.

AI 1.15. Ce sujet à l'ordre du jour se lit ainsi: "pour considérer de possibles attributions dans la gamme de 3-50 MHz au service de radiolocalisation pour des applications de radars océanographiques, prenant en considération les résultats des études UIT-R, en accord avec la résolution 612". Les rencontres de comités de l'UIT menant à la CMR-12 ont identifié les bandes suivantes à être étudiées sous ce sujet à l'ordre du jour: 3.5 . 5.5 MHz, 8 . 10 MHz, 12 . 14 MHz, 24 . 30 MHz, 39 . 45 MHz. Celles-ci ont été affinées à de possibles sous-bandes particulières incluant 5.060-5.450 MHz, 13.870-14.000 MHz, 24.000-24.890 MHz et 29.700-30.000 MHz. La position de l'UIRA est que les applications de radars océanographiques sont incompatibles avec les services radio amateur et les services satellites radio amateur dans la gamme de 3 à 50 Mhz et ne devraient pas être attribuées dans des bandes déjà allouées aux services de radio et de satellites radio amateur, incluant 5.250-5.450 MHz, à laquelle un nombre
grandissant d'administrations donnent un certain accès aux radioamateurs sur une base locale.

Annotations: À chaque CMR, il y a un sujet à l'ordre du jour qui traite des annotations contenues dans les Règlements sur la Radio. Généralement, c'est une situation où une administration (un pays) s'est désengagée d'une décision d'une CMR et dès lors crée une exception au tableau de fréquences dans les Règlements sur la Radio. Par exemple, un pays peut dire qu'il n'utilisera pas un certain service dans une partie du spectre qui leur a été allouée pour ce service par la CMR. Par conséquent, une annotation est inscrite dans les Règlements sur la Radio pour cette portion du spectre indiquant qu'une utilisation désignée n'est pas accessible dans ce pays même si elle peut l'être dans plusieurs autres parties du monde. Il y a nombre d'exemples d'annotations qui se réfèrent à la radio amateur. Une des tâches de l'UIRA pendant chaque CMR est d'essayer d'amener les administrations à enlever le nom de leur pays des annotations qui empêchent les radioamateurs de ce pays d'utiliser des parties du spectre qui sont
disponibles pour usage radio amateur dans d'autres pays.

Il y a d'autres sujets à l'ordre du jour pour lesquels l'UIRA a déterminé qu'ils sont une menace mineure pour les services radio amateur et satellites radio amateur, mais ces sujets seront étroitement surveillés par l'équipe UIRA à la CMR-12 pour s'assurer qu'ils n'auront pas un impact négatif sur la radio amateur.

La CMR-12 a débuté le lundi 23 janvier et se terminera vendredi le 17 février. Pendant cette période de quatre semaines, alors que les groupes de travail et les sous-groupes de travail épluchent les sujets à l'ordre du jour, je ferai rapport de tous les développements significatifs dans des bulletins électroniques subséquents.

Rod Stafford, W6ROD

Secrétaire – IARU Région 2

(Traduction par Serge Langlois, VE2AWR)

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

Rédacteur du blogue de RAC/rédacteur des nouvelles en ligne/bulletins de nouvelles web de RAC

RAC Bulletin 2012-005E – Outstanding ARES ID cards

RAC Bulletin 2012-005E – Outstanding ARES ID cards

2012-01-29

Good morning,

I am happy to advise that all outstanding ARES ID Cards are now "in the mail". Please accept my thanks for your patience. This has been a frustrating time that started with an absent supplier, then a sick supplier, then on to sourcing a new supplier at a reasonable cost, to eventually purchasing our own machine so I now do the cards in house here at my home office. Future turn around time will be days instead of weeks.

The other advantage we now have is the ability to print custom cards. As a benefit to affiliated Clubs and ARES Groups we can now offer printing in house of ID cards that are unique to your group, at the same cost ($4.00) as the ARES cards. Not only is this a benefit to you our members, but it will assist in the cost recovery time of our printer. Again, many thanks for your patience!

Later today I will be e-mailing some of you who did not send a picture with your card application. If you get this e-mail just send me a picture and I'll send your card out post haste.

73,

Doug Mercer VO1DTM CEC

Chief Field Services Officer

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

RAC Blog Editor/RAC E-News/Web News Bulletin Editor

Bulletin de RAC 2012-005F – Cartes ID de l’ARES en attente

Bulletin de RAC 2012-005F – Cartes ID de l'ARES en attente

2012-01-29

Bonjour,

Je suis heureux d'annoncer que toutes les cartes ID de l'ARES en attente sont maintenant postées. S.V.P. acceptez mes remerciements pour votre patience. Tout ceci a été une période frustrante qui a débuté avec un fournisseur absent, ensuite avec un fournisseur malade, et par la suite une recherche d'un nouveau fournisseur à un coût raisonnable, pour éventuellement acheter notre propre machine, ce qui fait que je fabrique les cartes à la maison dans mon bureau. Les futurs délais de livraison se compterons en jours plutôt qu'en semaines.

L'autre avantage que nous avons maintenant est la possibilité d'imprimer des cartes sur commande. En tant qu'avantage pour les clubs affiliés et les groupes ARES, nous pouvons maintenant offrir une impression-maison de cartes ID qui sont particulières à votre groupe, au même prix (4,00$) que les cartes de l'ARES. Non seulement est-ce un avantage pour vous nos membres, mais cela aidera au remboursement des coûts de notre imprimante. De nouveau, grands remerciements pour votre patience

Un peu plus tard dans la journée je contacterai par courriel ceux parmi vous qui n'ont pas envoyé de photo avec leur demande de carte. Si vous recevez ce courriel vous n'avez qu'à m'expédier une photo et je vous enverrai votre carte par poste accélérée.

Doug Mercer VO1DTM CEC

Responsable en chef des services extérieurs

(Traduction par Serge Langlois, VE2AWR)

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

Rédacteur du blogue de RAC/rédacteur des nouvelles en ligne/bulletins de nouvelles web de RAC

[Nouvelles-UIRA-R2 151] En attente d’une nouvelle bande de radio amateur

[Nouvelles-UIRA-R2 151] En attente d'une nouvelle bande de radio amateur

2011-12-28

Ramon Santoyo V. – Secrétaire – UIRA Région 2 rapporte:

Rapport de la CMR-2012 de G3PSM

Du progrès a été réalisé avec une proposition de compromis, article 1.23, rédigée pour prendre en considération les opinions de ceux qui sont pour et contre une attribution de servive radio amateur autour de 500 kHz. Cette proposition suggère un segment de 7 kHz entre 472 et 479 kHz, très proche de la position 472 à 480 kHz du CEPT. Des indices préliminaires montrent que cela serait acceptable pour plusieurs administrations et organisations régionales. Cependant, différentes rencontres doivent se tenir pour qu'elle soit formellement acceptée

Afin de peaufiner l'ébauche de proposition pour la prochaine rencontre du sous-groupe de travail, une réunion du groupe d'avant-projets sera tenue pendant le weekend. Au moment d'écrire ces lignes, les partisans du AUC (aucun changement) maintiennent fermement leurs positions.

Il ne reste plus que 3 semaines!

Source: Radio Society of Great Britain – Colin Thomas G3PSM

(Traduction par Serge Langlois, VE2AWR)

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

Rédacteur du blogue de RAC/rédacteur des nouvelles en ligne/bulletins de nouvelles web de RAC

[IARU-R2-News 151] Looking for a new amateur radio band

[IARU-R2-News 151] Looking for a new amateur radio band

2012-01-28

Ramon Santoyo V. – Secretary – IARU Region 2 wrote:

WRC-2012 report from G3PSM.

Progress was made with a compromise proposal on agenda item 1.23, drafted to take into consideration the views of those for and those against an amateur service allocation around 500kHz. This proposal suggests a 7kHz segment between 472-479kHz, very close to the CEPT position of 472-480kHz. Initial indications are that this could be acceptable to many administrations and regional organisations. However, various meetings need to take place to have these formally accepted.

In order to tidy up the draft for the next meeting of the sub working group, a weekend meeting of the drafting group will be held. At the time of writing the NOC No Change advocates steadfastly maintain their positions.

Only 3 weeks left!

Source: Radio Society of Great Britain – Colin Thomas G3PSM

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

RAC Blog Editor/RAC E-News/Web News Bulletin Editor

Bulletin de RAC 2012-004F – CMR-2012

Bulletin de RAC 2012-004F – CMR-2012

2011-12-23

Affichage blog – CMR2012

La Conférence Mondiale sur la Radio (CMR 2012) débute aujourd'hui et se poursuit jusqu'au 17 février 2012. Qu'est-ce que la CMR a de commun avec la radio amateur? C'est seulement une des façons pour Radio Amateurs du Canada d'être proactive dans l'élaboration des règlements qui gouvernent non seulement notre hobby, mais la radio dans son ensemble.

Cette année, la délégation du Canada est composée du personnel d'Industrie-Canada ainsi que de Bryan Rawlings VE3QN – notre représentant RAC.

Bryan fait seulement partie de l'équipe qui s'occupe du type de questions réglementaires. George Gorsline VE3YV agit en tant que responsable des affaires internationales. Norm Rashleigh VE3LC est le responsable des liaisons industrielles. Bill Gade VE4WO est le responsable des affaires réglementaires avec beaucoup d'aide de la part de Richard Ferch, qui donne du support aux affaires réglementaires.

Soyez à l'affût pour plus de détails sue la CMR 2012 dans un futur TCA – et, comme toujours – rappelez-vous que tout le monde de RAC est ici non seulement pour promouvoir le hobby, mais pour vous donner du support, vous nos membres. Contactez-nous si nous pouvons vous aider!

Bill Gade VE4WO

Responsable des affaires réglementaires de RAC

(Traduction par Serge Langlois, VE2AWR)

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

Rédacteur du blogue de RAC/rédacteur des nouvelles en ligne/bulletins de nouvelles web de RAC

RAC Bulletin 2012-004E – WRC-2012

RAC Bulletin 2012-004E – WRC-2012

2012-01-23

Blog Post – WRC2012

The World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC 2012) gets underway today and runs until February 17 2012.  What does the WRC +have to do with Amateur Radio?  Its just one way that the Radio Amateurs of Canada are active in the rules governing not only our hobby, but radio as a whole.  This year, the delegation from Canada is composed of Industry Canada Staff along with Bryan Rawlings VE3QN – our RAC representative.

Bryan is only part of the RAC team that deals with regulatory type matters.  George Gorsline VE3YV acts at the International Affairs Officer.  Norm Rashleigh VE3LC is the Industrial Liasion Officer.  Bill Gade VE4WO is the Regulatory Affairs Officer with a good amount of help from Richard Ferch, who provides support for Regulatory Affairs.

Look forward to more details on WRC 2012 in a future TCA – and as always – remember that everyone at RAC is here not only to promote the hobby but to provide support to you, our members.  Get in touch if we can be of assistance!

Bill Gade VE4WO

Regulatory Affairs Officer

**—-**

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec

RAC Blog Editor/RAC E-News/Web News Bulletin Editor

Bulletin de RAC 2012-003F – Nouveau directeur pour le Québec

Bulletin de RAC 2012-003F – Nouveau directeur pour le Québec

2011-01-22

Nous transmettons nos félicitations à M. Sheldon M. Werner, VA2SH / VA6SH, qui a été récemment élu en tant que directeur de RAC pour le Québec. M. Werner s’est présenté sans opposition, éliminant le besoin d’une élection à scrutin. Son rôle en tant que directeur le sera pour le reste d’un terme de deux ans se terminant le 31 décembre 2013. M. Werner est un opérateur radioamateur certifié depuis 1976 et a été impliqué dans plusieurs aspects du hobby. Il agit présentement en tant que vice-président pour le Montreal Amateur Radio Club.

Paul Burggraaf VO1PRB

Secrétaire corporatif de RAC

(Traduction par Serge Langlois, VE2AWR)