U.S. and foreign hams not exempt from Bill 118

Seems the three-year exemption from Ontario’s Bill 118 granted amateurs holding a valid radio operator’s certificate only applies to Canadian amateurs. The government exemption applies to operators holding radio certificates issued under the Radiocommunications Act (Canada). This means foreign amateurs including hams from the U.S. are not exempt from immediate prosecution under Ontario’s distracted driving legislation.

4 Responses to “U.S. and foreign hams not exempt from Bill 118”


  • So Ontario now wants to over-ride international agreements as well!

    RIC-3 – Information on the Amateur Radio Service5. Reciprocal Operating Agreements and Arrangements

    5.1 Convention between Canada and the United States of America
    The operation of amateur radio service equipment and stations in the territory of the other country is covered in Treaty Series 1952 No. 7 — Operation of Certain Radio Equipment or Stations, Convention between Canada and the United States of America.

    Visiting amateurs are not required to register or receive a permit before operating their amateur radio stations.

    Each amateur station shall indicate at least once during each contact with another station its geographical location as nearly as possible by city and state or city and province.

    The amateur station shall be operated in accordance with the laws and regulations of the country in which the station is temporarily located.

    anadian amateurs operating in the U.S. have the same privileges as they have in Canada, limited by U.S. band edges and mode restrictions in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations(CFR), Title 47, Chapter I (FCC), Part 97, Amateur Radio Service.

    U.S. amateurs operating in Canada must abide by the Radiocommunication Regulations and Radiocommunication Information Circular 2, Standards for the Operation of Radio Stations in the Amateur Radio Service RIC-2). Those who are qualified to send and receive Morse code at a speed of at least 5 w.p.m. may operate in accordance with privileges accorded to holders of the Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Basic, Morse code and Advanced Qualifications. U.S. amateurs who are not qualified to send and receive Morse code may operate in accordance with privileges accorded to holders of the Amateur Radio Operator Certificate with Basic Qualification.

    NB:The amateur station shall be operated in accordance with the laws and regulations of the country in which the station is temporarily located.

    Country….not Province.

    This gets more crazy all the time!

    73,
    Brian
    VE3BHD

  • U.S. and foreign amateurs can still operate their equipment while visiting Canada .. but now apparently not while driving a vehicle.

  • Regulatory Information Manager for ARRL notified and replied with thanks for this (confirmed) info and will do followup as well and notify their members about not being exempt for 3 years .

  • Some of you are misreading the regulation. First off municipal and/or provincial law cannot supersede federal law.
    Because Canada has a reciprical licensing agreement with the USA then by this agreement a US amateur has the same or equal license as a Canadian amateur. Thus an Amercian amateur would be included in exemption from all provincial legislation.

    (EDITOR’S NOTE: The information in VE7CM’s posting is incorrect as far as the time-limited exemption from Bill 118 in Ontario. A telephone conversation with Ministry of Ontario staff reveals that the exemption only applies to Canadian amateurs. U.S. Amateurs operating under the reciprocal agreement in Ontario must operate in hands-mode.)

Leave a Reply